Industry news


One of the things I tell students to do like Chicagoans vote — early and often — is to Google themselves. You need to know what’s out there about you so you can control the public presentation of yourself when it’s time to look for a job. I demand students clean up their online acts well before potential employers may be lurking around as faux Facebook friends looking for reasons to dump half the stack of resumes they’ve got. I Googled myself and found this YouTube clip. It’s raw footage from an interview I did with some of my Oregon State University students on the impact of new media on the election of President Obama:

What Kind of Tech User Are You?
The Pew Internet & American Life Project asks this in a quiz you can take to get a sense of where you fit in the tech spectrum.
Here are my results:

You are an Digital Collaborator
If you are a Digital Collaborator, you use information technology to work with and share your creations with others. You are enthusiastic about how ICTs help you connect with others and confident in your ability to manage digital devices and information. For you, the digital commons can be a camp, a lab, or a theater group – places to gather with others to develop something new.”

To all of my students: What are you?

 There is a lot of discussion about the impact of social media on journalism and what role it could/should play in ‘real’ journalism. Those of us who are teaching media in the midst of this revolution are thinking and talking a lot about how and what to teach while riding this often precarious wave. TED Talks, one of the best resources for exploring all kinds of important, timely topics, offers a wide range of thoughtful lectures examining all sides of social media in their series “Media with Meaning.” In his talk, ‘How Social Media Can Make History,” Clay Shirky argues:  

“While news from Iran streams to the world, Clay Shirky shows how Facebook, Twitter and TXTs help citizens in repressive regimes to report on real news, bypassing censors (however briefly). The end of top-down control of news is changing the nature of politics.”

Clay Shirky: How Social Media Can Make History

In his talk, “When Social Media Became News,” James Surowiecki argues the 2005 tsunami transformed social media forever. Check it out:

recovery.doi.gov
The U.S. Geological Survey is using funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to support a student who’s investigating social Internet technologies as a way to quickly gather information about recent earthquakes.

Bookmark and Share

blog.taragana.com
USGS monitoring Twitter for earthquake details

USC Marshall School of Business to Offer Professional Certificate for New Media Management

August 17, 2009 – LOS ANGELES, CA — University of Southern California Marshall School of Business Executive Education today announced that it will be offering a new professional certificate program– “Certificate of New Media Management” – for participants of its highly-successful New Media Management programs.

The New Media Management programs—jointly offered by USC Marshall and Really Useful Information (RUI)– is a series of three in-depth online courses: Digital Media and Technology Management, Media and Entertainment Leadership, and Branding and Integrated Marketing. The full series gives media and entertainment executives comprehensive education that helps them more effectively leverage new media technologies to build or enhance the profitability of their businesses.

Hallmarks of the USC/RUI approach are

* Convenient 24/7 online access. USC/RUI courses are offered exclusively online, allowing busy execs to attend courses at their convenience at any time anywhere.

* Industry-seasoned subject matter experts. USC/RUI courses are taught by leading University professors partnered with working industry subject matter experts, bringing the best possible synthesis of established “best practices” with first-hand industry experience

* Safe collaborative environment. USC/RUI creates a safe learning environment where executives can feel free to discuss their issues and collaborate with teachers and fellow students to solve problems.

* Actionable information. USC/RUI courses provide information and connections that allow students to immediately begin implementing their knowledge in the workplace.

* Intra-industry networking. USC/RUI continue to promote professional development through ongoing events (online and offline) that foster a strong sense of community and support between instructors, students and members of the entertainment industry.

“The Digital Media and Technology Program provided a full-breadth understanding of the digital media landscape. The course leaders were deeply knowledgeable, sharing their real-world experience of failures and successes. It is already helping me in my current role,” said Jessica Hill, Ascent Media.

Those interested in signing up for USC/RUI courses can visit: http://www.marshall.usc.edu/newmedia.

ABOUT USC MARSHALL SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Based in Los Angeles at the University of Southern California, at the crossroads of the Pacific Rim, the USC Marshall School is the best place to learn the art and science of business. The school’s programs serve nearly 5,000 undergraduate, graduate, professional and executive-education students, who attend classes in facilities at the main Los Angeles campus, as well as satellite facilities in Irvine and San Diego. USC Marshall also operates a Global MBA program in conjunction with Jiao Tong University in Shanghai, China.

ABOUT RUI

Really Useful Information (RUI) is the leading provider of professional education and development for entertainment and media industry executives. Its vanguard face-to-face and online programs – Digital Media and Technology Management, Branding and Integrated Marketing and Media and Entertainment Leadership – are produced in conjunction with USC’s Marshall School of Business. Headquartered in Los Angeles, the company can be found at http://www.rui.us.com.

Max Benesi
Spiralgroup
tel. 1-213-596-6253 x 721
fax 1 415 358 9807

Spiralgroup
A DIFFERENT SPIN ON MARKETING & PUBLIC RELATIONS

Check out this excellent exploration of Google:

The best way to watch “Inside the Mind of Google,” Maria Bartiromo’s report on the Internet giant Thursday on CNBC, is to not watch the first quarter of it.

Inside Google. The most powerful and successful technology company in the world.

ABOUT THE SHOW

In the next CNBC Original, Maria Bartiromo takes viewers Inside The Mind of Google for a rare look at the world’s most powerful technology company and its crown jewel, the Google Internet search engine. This is the fascinating story of how two grad students, in barely a decade, took a one-time research project and turned it into a global technology powerhouse…changing the way we interact with information, the Internet, and each other. See how Google came to dominate the search industry and turn it into a profit machine… and see where it’s taking its next step… and how the company plans to address arguably the biggest controversy in today’s digital age: privacy.

https://i1.wp.com/s7.addthis.com/static/btn/lg-share-en.gif

A student of mine is writing a story about Twitter on campus for another class. I thought his questions — and hopefully my answers — were worth a blog post:

1) What’s your official title at Oregon State University? What name would you like to be referred by in the article? What’s your age? Finally, how long have you been teaching?

ANSWER: I’m an Instructor in NMC at OSU. Pamela Cytrynbaum. Second reference is always “Cytrynbaum.” I’m 43. I’ve been teaching in one form or another for 12 years.

Now onto our subject.

2) Do you think Twitter is widely used by students on campus? Have you encountered Twitter in any of your classrooms (as an interruption or distraction, perhaps)?

ANSWER: No, I don’t see much use of Twitter on campus at all. In fact, I’ve been surprised at how few students have even heard of it when I raise the question in all of my classes. Very few of my my students — most of whom are new media students — use it. I require my NMC 301 (Writing for the Media Professional) students to learn it and do one assignment where they Twitter an event. It’s important for them to know what it is and how to use it. Once that’s done, it’s up to them to continue or not. Some do.

I think it seems useless to many students. They’ve got texts and Facebook messages coming in…what do they need this shortened social networking tool for? Far fewer students seem to continue on with Twitter after learning it in class than with blogging. I have many students who blog for the first time in my class and then get hooked and build their blogs and keep them going. They see the value in that. I’m not sure Twitter offers enough payoff for the effort. For me, I’ve had lots of fun with it. I use it as storage for all kinds of links I want to keep for classes, to connect with organizations, media outlets, friends, writers, to keep up with their lives and work. I don’t follow anybody who uses Twitter to proclaim an ingrown toenail. I’m looking for actual information.

I’m a working, writing mom. I don’t have one second in the day to waste on that.

3) Do you think Twitter has any potential as a teaching aid? In your opinion, should teachers or campus officials use Twitter to spread information to students?

ANSWER: I can’t speak for any other teachers or tell them what to do. I know from being a Twitter Follower of the Chronicle of Higher Education (and a regular reader) that there are lots of professors arguing for and against the use of Twitter. One story I read was by someone advocating the use of Twitter DURING classes and conference lectures as a way to INCREASE engagement.

Personally, I’d lose my mind juggling that. I’d rather have somebody comment in person so I can see them, hear them, respond one human being to another. But this person argued strongly that for them, Twittering deeply enriched the teaching experience. It’s important to take it seriously, though, and not just ignore or disregard Twitter. There are plenty of stories and surveys that have found Twitter is the top social networking medium for helping people get immediate information on natural disasters, like the Indonesian Tsunami. But, as we’ve seen just yesterday in the news about the swine flu issue, it’s also a mechanism for spreading false or overly-hyped information that can be deeply concerning. Either way, it’s here, and the larger plugged-in world is taking advantage of this technology. We need to check it out for ourselves and make our own choices.

(more…)

Next Page »