There is a lot of discussion about the impact of social media on journalism and what role it could/should play in ‘real’ journalism. Those of us who are teaching media in the midst of this revolution are thinking and talking a lot about how and what to teach while riding this often precarious wave. TED Talks, one of the best resources for exploring all kinds of important, timely topics, offers a wide range of thoughtful lectures examining all sides of social media in their series “Media with Meaning.” In his talk, ‘How Social Media Can Make History,” Clay Shirky argues:  

“While news from Iran streams to the world, Clay Shirky shows how Facebook, Twitter and TXTs help citizens in repressive regimes to report on real news, bypassing censors (however briefly). The end of top-down control of news is changing the nature of politics.”

Clay Shirky: How Social Media Can Make History

In his talk, “When Social Media Became News,” James Surowiecki argues the 2005 tsunami transformed social media forever. Check it out:

Wish I had time to write and think about all the cool new New Media ideas flying around out there…here’s one for my students and me to ponder in class this week:

From NPR Talk of the Nation, Jan. 8, 2009

Talk of the Nation, January 8, 2009 · Social networking, user feedback and Tweeting are now common Web experiences. Clay Shirky, author of Here Comes Everybody, isn’t surprised. He knows what works online, what doesn’t, and why — and he just might know what’s next.

“When we change the way we communicate, we change society,” Shirky writes. “The tools that a society uses to create and maintain itself are as central to human life as a hive is to bee life. Though the hive is not part of any individual bee, it is part of the colony, both shaped by and shaping the lives of its inhabitants.”

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=99126586