There is a lot of discussion about the impact of social media on journalism and what role it could/should play in ‘real’ journalism. Those of us who are teaching media in the midst of this revolution are thinking and talking a lot about how and what to teach while riding this often precarious wave. TED Talks, one of the best resources for exploring all kinds of important, timely topics, offers a wide range of thoughtful lectures examining all sides of social media in their series “Media with Meaning.” In his talk, ‘How Social Media Can Make History,” Clay Shirky argues:  

“While news from Iran streams to the world, Clay Shirky shows how Facebook, Twitter and TXTs help citizens in repressive regimes to report on real news, bypassing censors (however briefly). The end of top-down control of news is changing the nature of politics.”

Clay Shirky: How Social Media Can Make History

In his talk, “When Social Media Became News,” James Surowiecki argues the 2005 tsunami transformed social media forever. Check it out:

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For my students… Readings, questions on the life, death and structure of newsrooms in the age of new media….

Here are some excellent articles, blog posts, websites, etc… that offer a variety of perspectives and discussions about the structure of newsrooms, who does what, what changes are needed to remake the traditional reporting structures into new media models. Take a look and see what sparks your interest.

These are just a few examples of hundreds of interesting articles, posts, etc… written about the transformation of newspapers and print media into the digital age. It’s a crucial part of any discussion or class on reporting. Where will we do this reporting and how must it change? MUST it change? What is lost in the new media model? What is gained? WHO is a “real” reporter these days? Are bloggers reporters? What skills are now required? What should we value or require to trust those gathering information?

Mon, Apr 13, 2009 — News without newspapers
Interesting story in the Media section of The New York Times today:
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/13/technology/start-ups/13hyperlocal.html?_r=1&th&emc=th

‘Hyperlocal’ Web Sites Deliver News Without Newspapers
“By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER and BRAD STONE
Published: April 12, 2009

http://www.journalism.org/node/11961

http://www.thenation.com/doc/20090406/nichols_mcchesney

http://www.stateofthenewsmedia.com/2008/narrative_newspapers_intro.php?cat=0&media=4

http://www.newspaperdeathwatch.com/

http://blog.searchenginewatch.com/090328-181359

http://www.timporter.com/firstdraft/archives
/000405.html http://www.megantaylor.org/wordpress/2008/04/04/convergence-and-newsroom-structure/

http://newsvideographer.com/2008/03/06/down-with-the-traditional-newsroom-structure/

University of Oregon Daily Emerald newspaper staffers ON STRIKE!!!
Quite a story unfolding down the road. Much to chew on from all sides:

http://media.www.dailyemerald.com/media/storage/paper859/news/2009/03/04/News/Emerald.News.Staff.Strikes-3658778.shtml

EMERALD NEWS STAFF STRIKES

Newsroom staff will not produce another paper until the Emerald Board of Directors meets four demands to preserve student control and editorial independence, future of organization

by Ashley Chase and Allie Grasgreen | Editor in chief and Managing editor |

PUBLISHED ON 3/4/09 IN News

The entire editorial staff of the Oregon Daily Emerald is on strike, effective at 6 a.m. Wednesday, March 4. The strike is in response to recent actions of the Emerald’s Board of Directors, which oversees the entire Emerald organization. This is the last edition of the Emerald we will publish until the board meets the four demands the entire newsroom staff presented to the board at its executive session meeting last night. A copy of that speech can be found at the end of this article.

http://www.stillanewspaperman.com/2009/03/04/this-fight-will-go-on-without-me/

STEVE SMITH RESPONDS:

This fight will go on without me

Good morning,

Well, I find myself in an awkward position this morning re: my work with the Daily Emerald at the University of Oregon.

As I have written here before, I have been consulting with the Emerald, at the request of and with the support of its board of directors, since last November.

I prepared a strategic plan for the board outlining steps I believed were necessary if the paper is to be saved from financial disaster.

At one point, the board chairman asked if I would be willing to step in and take on the general manager job, open since last June, and re-described by me as “publisher” in the strategic plan.